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Tag Archives: Localization

Machine Translation Master Course Newsletter – Issue 2

Machine Translation Master Course Newsletter – Issue 2

Machine Translation Master Class Newsletter – Issue 2

As the Instructor for the Machine Translation Master Class from The Localization Institute, I am very happy to continue to share with you my ideas about the relationship between humans and machines. In this issue, we will discuss it from a data management perspective.

Why is data management relevant to me?

 

In 2016, Google said in a statement when it corrected a bug translating “Russia” as “Mordor”, “Google Translate is an automatic translator — it works without the intervention of human translators, using technology instead.” (See here)

 

Indeed Google Translate did not have human translators involved in its translation process. But remember, all natural language data comes from humans in their daily life. You might have heard things like “if you hear it enough, you’ll start to believe it”.  The “illusion of truth” effect also applies to machines. A machine will believe what it has seen after looking for patterns in hundreds of millions of documents. You can, of course, try to fix some problems by manually correcting them. Yet, in many cases, in particular in a neural MT system, it is very difficult for humans to manually hit the quantity and complexity that the hidden layers present and thus some features have to be deleted in order to avoid potentially catastrophic mistakes. Therefore, it makes a lot of sense if we can control the quality and quantity of data before feeding it to a machine. Data management is one of the most effective ways to control MT related risks.

 

Why is some data more relevant than others?

Relevance, first and foremost, is based on the comparison. In a localization process, this comparison often happens between your data and the source text. You can compare them from different perspectives. A translator, for example, usually judges the relevance of their reference materials by searching for concepts, words or knowledge about these words that are similar to those appearing in the source text. If a 100-page document did not include any of these, most probably this translator will give up reading. Humans can make such decisions in a split second. Yet it is a daunting task for machines to simulate this process. So typically an MT engine would diligently scan the whole database and analyze the pattern. If a big percentage of data is irrelevant, it is a waste of computing power and you could not achieve your goal. Of course, in the machine world, language data is processed in a different way. For example, neural MT uses embeddings to capture word meaning whereas statistical MT uses n-gram to process corpora. So we cannot judge data relevance only from a human’s perspective. Yet this analogy helps you get a rough picture based on your intuition.

Who is involved in the process of managing MT-driven data?

While IT professionals can communicate your ideas to machines, it is translators, linguists, project managers, and content managers, who can really make sense out of the data from a human perspective. With effective communication that is based on relevant technological knowledge, you will be able to generate a “collective” insight from your team, other teams outside your department, clients, end-users, and last but not least, your machine. This insight will navigate your attention to meet your needs.

Finally, it is important to point out that there are many more aspects regarding data management in an MT deployment process. For example, data quantity, data generated in an interactive MT or an MTPE (Machine Translation Post Editing) process, and data format. It is definitely an intriguing topic we can further explore.

 

Takeaways:

 

  1. Data management is one of the most effective ways to control MT related risks
  2. Data relevance is key to train an MT engine
  3. Communication helps the team make sense out of the data

 

If you want to know more about machine translation, sign up for our next Machine Translation Master Class.

 

Learn More:

 

Mach-Trans-MC-rz

 

If you are interested in learning more about the Machine Translation Master Class please click here.
Peng-cropped

About the Author

Dr. Peng Wang has been teaching, researching and practicing localization in three continents. She is the convener for EDUinLOC, a part-time professor for the School of Translation and Interpretation at the University of Ottawa and a freelance conference interpreter with the Translation Bureau of the Canadian government. Before that, she was a CAT Tools Coordinator at the Graduate Studies in Interpreting and Translation at the University of Maryland. She has chaired the automation/AI track for LocWorldWide conferences since 2020. Her current research interests include human learning vs. machine learning, machine translation risk management, terminology and multilingual data analysis.

Dr. Wang began conducting corpus-based translation studies at the University of Liverpool and later she worked in the Corpus Research Lab at the Northern Arizona University. She has a rich experience of teaching multilingual classes, with students aged from 18 to over 70, in over 10 language combinations, coming from UAE, China, Italy, Spain, Germany, Morocco, Colombia, Mexico, and Haiti, to name just a few. She is an expert in approaching technology in the context of culture and humanities.

 

Connect with Dr. Peng Wang:

Connect with Dr. Peng Wang on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/pengjanewang/.

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Disclaimer
Copyright © 2021 The Localization Institute. All rights reserved. This document and translations of it may be copied and furnished to others, and derivative works that comment on or otherwise explain it or assist in its implementation may be prepared, copied, published, and distributed, in whole or in part, without restriction of any kind, provided that the above copyright notice and this section are included on all such copies and derivative works. However, this document itself may not be modified in any way, including by removing the copyright notice or references to The Localization Institute, without the permission of the copyright owners. This document and the information contained herein is provided on an “AS IS” basis and THE LOCALIZATION INSTITUTE DISCLAIMS ALL WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO ANY WARRANTY THAT THE USE OF THE INFORMATION HEREIN WILL NOT INFRINGE ANY OWNERSHIP RIGHTS OR ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.

Machine Translation Master Course Newsletter – Issue 1

Machine Translation Master Course Newsletter – Issue 1

Machine Translation Master Course Newsletter – Issue 1

As the Instructor for the new Machine Translation Master Class from The Localization Institute, I’ve been passionate about the relationship between humans and machines for many years. Since 2004 when I completed my PhD thesis entitled Harry Potter and its Chinese Translation using corpus linguistic methodology and translation theories, I have constantly been reflecting on how we can convert our thoughts to machine readable representations and make use of machine power. Machine Translation, in particular, Neural Machine Translation, is definitely a fascinating manifestation of human intelligence in machines. Having said that, I would rather say I am a researcher and practitioner on cultures and humanities in the name of machine learning and artificial intelligence, as I consider such models as neural networks are significant attempts to demonstrate or simulate human intelligence whereas my ultimate goal is to work with you to explore what’s deep in our mind and what our common humanity is. After all, machine is part of human, demonstrating the representable and decipherable part of all of us. On the other hand, all the unexpected aspects that machines are not capable of can be considered risks, which will eventually be taken care of by humans. That’s also the reason why we focus on risk management in this Machine Translation Master Course.

How can I manage the risks related to Machine Translation?

All risk management considerations are built on knowledge and experience. To successfully manage MT-related risks, first and foremost, you have to possess basic knowledge about machine translation so that every decision you are going to make is well balanced between your intuition based on your past experience in the industry and sufficient (not necessarily all) knowledge about machine translation and machine learning. This Machine Translation Master Course covers some of this basic knowledge, for example, some fundamental classifications associated with Machine Translation risk management, including:

  • Two basic types of MT-related risks
  • Two basic types of MT-related technology
  • Two primary purposes of using technology

1. How do I classify the risks related to Machine Translation?

There are two types of risks when we implement machine translation systems: intrinsic and extrinsic ones. In order to control extrinsic risks, you have to possess a good knowledge of what relevant intrinsic factors are. Thus it is important for us to understand the basic inner workings of machine translation as well as its supporting technology. In this Machine Translation Master Course, we mainly focus on the architectural designs of three types of MT systems, namely, rule-based MT, statistical MT and neural MT, as well as relevant CAT tools that are directly useful for various Machine Translation deployment solutions.

2. How do I classify the technology related to Machine Translation?

Fundamentally speaking, there are two types of technology: tool-based technology and intelligent technology. Like why we use bicycles, we use tool-based technological tools to help us improve productivity.  Under these circumstances, human intelligence is the key to success. In terms of intelligent technology, on the other hand, humans are more in a position to monitor and correct machine generated results, which in turn supports machine learning and improves artificial intelligence. Does Machine Translation belong to tool-based or intelligent technology? It depends on such factors as how you deploy Machine Translation systems, the relationship between human & machine, and your purpose of using it.

3. Why do we use technology?

Technology can serve both humans and machines. In essence, our ultimate goal is always to have machines serve us better. Yet nowadays we can see more human-machine interaction (HMI) activities have aimed to train machines more than human beings. This poses new opportunities and challenges for us. Do you know that convincing evidence in cognitive science, computer science and learning theories indicates that human brains learn better than any machine… at least for now? So rather than resisting change, it makes more sense for us to empower ourselves to better prepare for the machine-human revolution. After all, it is all up to each one of you!

 

If you want to know more about machine translation, sign up for our next Machine Translation Master Class.

 

Learn More:

 

Mach-Trans-MC-rz

 

If you are interested in learning more about the Machine Translation Master Class please click here.
Peng-cropped

About the Author

Dr. Peng Wang is a part-time professor for the School of Translation and Interpretation at the University of Ottawa and a freelance conference interpreter with the Translation Bureau of the Canadian government. Before that, she was a CAT Tools Coordinator at the Graduate Studies in Interpreting and Translation at the University of Maryland. She was the coach and curator for the automation track for LocWorldWide42. Her current research interests include cognitive interpreting/translation studies and AI, risk management of NMT implementation, terminology and multilingual data analysis.

Dr. Wang began conducting corpus-based translation studies at the University of Liverpool and later she worked in the corpus linguistic program at Northern Arizona University. She has a rich experience of teaching multilingual classes, with students aging from 22 to 75, in over 10 language combinations, coming from UAE, China, Italy, Spain, Germany, Morocco, Colombia, Mexico, and Haiti, to name just a few. She is an expert in approaching technology in the context of culture and common core humanity.

 

Connect with Dr. Peng Wang:

Connect with Dr. Peng Wang on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/pengjanewang/.

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Disclaimer
Copyright © 2021 The Localization Institute. All rights reserved. This document and translations of it may be copied and furnished to others, and derivative works that comment on or otherwise explain it or assist in its implementation may be prepared, copied, published, and distributed, in whole or in part, without restriction of any kind, provided that the above copyright notice and this section are included on all such copies and derivative works. However, this document itself may not be modified in any way, including by removing the copyright notice or references to The Localization Institute, without the permission of the copyright owners. This document and the information contained herein is provided on an “AS IS” basis and THE LOCALIZATION INSTITUTE DISCLAIMS ALL WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO ANY WARRANTY THAT THE USE OF THE INFORMATION HEREIN WILL NOT INFRINGE ANY OWNERSHIP RIGHTS OR ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.

Video Game Localization: More than Creative Translation

Video Game Localization: More than Creative Translation

Video Game Localization: More than Creative Translation

The video game industry saw its biggest year to date in 2020, with an estimated market value of 159.3Bn and an expected 7.7% annual growth rate by 2023 according to Newzoo’s figures. Suffice to say, localization is becoming increasingly relevant, not only for game developers and publishers but for gaming and language enthusiasts around the world.

In the last few years we have watched as new university courses, online webinars, and industry events, such as Game Global, have heightened their focus on video game localization. As a consequence, video game localization is getting more standardized and even those who are not familiar with game development and localization are starting to see that there is a lot more to localizing games than a bunch of geeks translating their favorite game into their native language.

While it’s true that video game localization entails a lot of translation of the creative text, a true expert knows that there are several other critical elements. Below our Game Localization Master Class teacher, Francesca Sorrentino has drawn up the top five things to keep in mind as a localization expert when approaching video game localization.

Video game localization is a process and each phase is important

Usually, those who approach video game localization come from a linguistic background and are primarily focused on translation, suffering together with the linguists who translate their favorite games and are at the forefront of a never-ending battle for quality. The truth is, translation is only part of the localization process. Depending on your position within your localization team or the broader game development team, it might not be your first priority.

Pre-production is key

In order for the localization process to be successful, it needs to be thoroughly planned and diligently budgeted. Have you ever heard of internationalization (I18n) and culturalization? They are the bread and butter of any localization manager who works closely with the game team. Preparing the game code for localization and analyzing the markets you want to localize for are only a few of the steps involved in the pre-production phase.

To QA or… to QA? There is no question!

Quality Assurance (QA) is one of the most important phases of the localization process and should never be skipped. During QA, testers get the chance not only to play the game (one of the biggest perks of being in this industry!) but to see the localized text and audio in context and help deliver the best quality of the product.

Know thy (desk) neighbor

As in any other process or business relationship, communication should never be neglected. No matter where you are in the video game localization chain, it is important to be aware of what is happening around you: knowing what your colleagues in the product team or marketing department do will give you more context to better understand the game and the purpose of your job, saving you from a lot of unnecessary (and frustrating) emails with needed last-minute changes.

Technology is here to help

No, machine translation (MT) won’t be the end of the translator species! It must be embraced as part of a suite of productivity tools to make our lives easier and improve quality across the board. Localization technology is constantly evolving, with more gaming companies adopting the latest content management systems (CMS), translation management systems (TMS), and project management tools.

If you want to know more about the video game localization process, sign up for our next Game Localization Master Class.

 

Learn More:

 

Game-Loc-MC

 

If you are interested in learning more about the Game Localization Master Class please click here.

 

0

About the Author

Francesca Sorrentino has been in the video game localization industry since 2010, covering various roles: from marketing intern and translator for online games at Wooga and Bigpoint, to Senior Multilingual Localization Specialist at Electronic Arts managing large, multilingual titles such as FIFA, to Program Manager for the Games department at Alpha CRC.

Having experienced both the client and the service provider side of the industry, Francesca recently decided to become a freelance translator and consultant and is currently working as Conference Manager for Game Global, a conference dedicated to video game localization and QA, which is continuing to give her the chance deepen her knowledge about processes, challenges and best practices in the gaming industry.

Francesca holds a B.A. in Translation and an M.A. in Conference Interpreting, which she obtained in Italy, and has spent the last 10 years living and working first in Germany and now in beautiful Barcelona, Spain.

Connect with Francesca:

Connect with Francesca on LinkedIn

Email: Francesca[at]gameglobal.events

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Disclaimer
Copyright © 2021 The Localization Institute. All rights reserved. This document and translations of it may be copied and furnished to others, and derivative works that comment on or otherwise explain it or assist in its implementation may be prepared, copied, published, and distributed, in whole or in part, without restriction of any kind, provided that the above copyright notice and this section are included on all such copies and derivative works. However, this document itself may not be modified in any way, including by removing the copyright notice or references to The Localization Institute, without the permission of the copyright owners. This document and the information contained herein is provided on an “AS IS” basis and THE LOCALIZATION INSTITUTE DISCLAIMS ALL WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO ANY WARRANTY THAT THE USE OF THE INFORMATION HEREIN WILL NOT INFRINGE ANY OWNERSHIP RIGHTS OR ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.

Localization Management Master Class – Spring/Summer 2020

Localization Management Master Class – Spring/Summer 2020

The way localization is integrated into a company is critical to the company’s long term success because most enterprises will generate a large share of their revenue from global markets. A pivotal factor in achieving global success, localization often sneaks in through the back door and never gets the respect it deserves. It ends up being seen as a mere operational unit, a cost center if you will, and is not given the chance to contribute as the strategic asset it really is.

From setting up localization from scratch to repositioning it from a cost center to strategic partner is a complex journey, a journey Karen Combe knows well. For 15 of the 20 years she worked in Localization at PTC, Karen had the opportunity to affect company policy and strategy as a Vice President.

The Localization Institute is pleased to offer an instructor-led online Masterclass on Localization Management with Karen Combe.  In four one-hour sessions, Karen will share best practices in Localization Management on the buyer’s side.

The preview webinar is now over, the recording is linked at the bottom of this page.

Session #1 The Organization: Models for Localization Department Organization
Thursday, July 23rd
9AM West Coast Time
11AM Central Time Zone
12PM East Coast Time Zone

Session #2 The Business: Not a Service, but a Business Within the Enterprise
Thursday, July 30th
9AM West Coast Time
11AM Central Time Zone
12PM East Coast Time Zone

Session #3 The Technology: Considerations for Owning or Outsourcing Technology
Thursday, August 6th
9AM West Coast Time
11AM Central Time Zone
12PM East Coast Time Zone

Session #4 The Relationships: Interaction with Stakeholders Inside and Outside the Enterprise
Thursday, August 13th
9AM West Coast Time
11AM Central Time Zone
12PM East Coast Time Zone

To allow for a high level of interactivity, the class is limited to 18 attendees. About one month after the conclusion of the class, there will be an additional session led by Karen to give students an opportunity to ask questions and to share experiences from applying the lessons learned. To protect privacy and confidentiality, sessions will not be recorded.

All students who complete the Localization Management Masterclass will receive an Industry Certificate of Completion from The Localization Institute, Inc. 

This Master Class is for:
  • Professionals whose company is entering localization and have been given responsibility for the implementation 
  • Individuals who are already working in localization but would like to advance to a localization management position
  • People who are currently managing localization but would like to benchmark their operation
  • Professionals on the vendor side of the industry who want to make sure they understand the challenges localization managers face

What To Expect

I’ve known Karen for over a decade. She has been a leading voice in the Localization industry. Throughout her professional journey, she’s accumulated decades worth of in-depth localization and business expertise. Karen has been a leader and mentor for many colleagues in the industry, which makes her a fabulous choice to lead this master class. 

Karen Combe is one of those deep-thinking localization industry leaders whose vision and insight I have always trusted. I particularly value her viewpoints on how global industry trends will affect the localization industry going forward.

Karen has in-depth knowledge about the Localization industry – from both vendor and client sides. Her stories will not only enlighten you, they will teach you how to avoid many localization pitfalls.

Karen is a trusted friend and colleague with a wealth of industry experience building and evolving localization teams and models in the enterprise. A testament to her leadership and expertise, there are a number of translation leaders in the industry today who got where they are with her tutelage.
Teresa MarshallVP Globalization & Localization - Salesforce
Mimi HillsDirector - VMware
Jean-François VanreuselDirector of Globalization - Adobe
Wayne BourlandDirector Global Translation Team - Dell Technologies
translation-tech-workshops-tools

Course Fees

$599.00 Introductory Price 

$699.00 Regularly Priced

Cancellation Policy:

The Localization Institute, Inc. reserves the right to cancel the Localization Management Master Class if there are less than 10 registrants prior to the first workshop.
You will receive a full refund if the course is canceled.

About Your Trainer

KarenCombe

Karen Combe recently retired from her position as Vice President of Localization at PTC, where she was responsible for product localization as well as for localization support for PTCU, Technical Support, and Marketing. She has been a member of the GILT Leaders Forum, a community of peers in the localization industry, since its inception. Previously, Karen was Senior Vice President at International Language Engineering, where she managed Client Services, Sales and Marketing. Karen holds a B.A in Linguistics from the University of California at Berkeley and a post-graduate degree in Social Anthropology from the University of Cambridge. She served in the Peace Corps in Senegal and in International Voluntary Services in Algeria. In addition, Karen worked for 8 years on a ranch in northwestern Colorado training horses and looking after a large herd of cattle.

Course Overview

Preview Webinar Recording

Seattle L10N PM Certification 2018 – Registration Closed

Seattle L10N PM Certification 2018 – Registration Closed

The online training is followed by a classroom workshop.  The workshop will be held on October 15-16 at the Mayflower Hotel in Seattle, WA. Please visit the website for information on location and directions.  We do not have sleeping rooms reserved. You will need to make your own arrangements if you need sleeping rooms. The workshop will include a review of the online material, small group exercises and presentations from localization professionals. The workshop concludes with the certification exam. It is essential that participants bring a laptop to the workshop.

Requirements

Attendees will have 3-5 years of experience in localization on either the vendor or buyer side. Please contact us if you have questions about the prerequisites. You will have up to 10 weeks to complete the online self- study prior to the workshop.

Agenda

 

October 15, 2018
Arrival/Check-in 9:00-9:30
Introductions and Review After introductions, the presenter will review the self-study materials and answer questions 9:30-10:30

 

Break 10:30-11:00
Global readiness/Maturity In small groups discuss, document and present global readiness and localization maturity of your own organization 11:00 – 12:00
Lunch 12:00-1:00
Planning In small groups develop, document and present a work breakdown structure for a fictitious project 1:00-2:30
Break 2:30-3:00
Scheduling  In small groups create a schedule for building your house 3:00-4:00
Case Study  Loïc Dufresne de Virel, Intel 4:00-5:00

 

October 16, 2018
Risk Management In small groups develop, document and present a Risk Breakdown Structure for a fictitious project 9:00-10:30
Break 10:30-11:00
Case Study Samantha Reiss, Welocalize 11:00-12:00
Lunch 12:00-1:00
Case Study Erik Vogt, Moravia 1:00-2:00
Break 2:00-2:30
Certification Exam Two hours to complete a 75 question certification test 2:30-4:30

About Your Trainer

Willem_Stoleer_Localization_Institute_team-200x200

Willem grew up in Amsterdam where he obtained his undergraduate and graduate degrees at the University of Amsterdam. After many years in software development, Willem made the move to localization. He has over 25 years of experience in translation, localization and internationalization of marketing materials, software products and web content. Training for localization is a top priority for Willem with focus on project, quality and risk management. Willem has spent four years with the Project Management Institute as director of professional development for the Portland chapter. He is also a former professor at the Monterey Institute of International Studies and has been involved with the Localization Institute from the start.

Willem is the creator and presenter of the Localization Project Management Certification and the Quality Management in Translation Certification Programs. Willem also organizes the US and European round tables for project management.

seattle-web-event

Course Fees

Registration Closes on September 24. All fees must be paid by September 24 to attend the course.

Regular Single Registration – $1,450

Regular Group Registration (~10% less for 2+) – $1,275 each

Group registration discounts are offered when 2 or more individuals from the same organization register together. The discount is not retroactive.

Program fees include online training, registration for the on-site workshop, test fees for the certification exam, program materials, and lunch and breaks during the 2-day workshop.

Discounts must be used at registration; they are not retroactive. Early Bird tickets must be paid for within 1 week after Early Bird deadline.

Attendees are responsible for their own travel and lodging.

Cancellation Policy:

The Localization Institute, Inc. reserves the right to cancel the Localization Project Management Certification Program if there are less than 15 registrants by one month prior to the workshop. If the program is canceled, you will receive a full refund, minus $500 if you have already started the online training portion.  We can make accommodations to allow you to take the test remotely and receive the certification.  If you choose to do so, you will receive a full refund of the registration fee, minus $900.

You will receive a refund if you cancel up to 3 weeks prior to the workshop, minus $500 if you have already started the online training portion. After that, there is no refund.
We can always, on an individual basis only, make exceptions for illness, etc. or offer credit for the next round of certification.
Warsaw L10N PM Certification 2018 – Registration Now Closed!

Warsaw L10N PM Certification 2018 – Registration Now Closed!

Requirements

Attendees will have 3-5 years of experience in localization   on either the vendor or buyer side. It is essential that participants bring a laptop to the classroom sessions. Please contact us if you have questions about the pre-requisites. The videos can also be viewed on a tablet or smartphone by accessing Litmos through the device’s browser.

Localization PM Certification Workshop

Warsaw, Poland                                                                                         4-5 June 2018

 

4 June 2018

Arrival/Check in 9:00-9:30
Introductions and Review After introductions, the presenter will review the self study materials and answer questions 9:30-10:30

 

Break 10:30-11:00
Global Readiness/Maturity In small groups discuss, document and present global readiness and localization maturity of your own organization 11:00 – 12:00
Lunch 12:00-13:00
Planning In small groups develop, document and present a work breakdown structure for a fictitious project 13:00-14:30
Break 14:30-15:00
Scheduling In small groups create a schedule for building your house 15:00-16:00
Case Study Michaela Bartelt, Electronic Arts  16:00-17:00

 

5 June 2018

Risk Management In small groups develop, document and present a Risk Breakdown Structure for a fictitious project 9:00-10:30
Break  10:30-11:00
Case Study Alessandro Cattelan, Translated Srl 11:00-12:00
Lunch 12:00-13:00
Case Study Gary Lefman, Cisco

INTERNATIONALISATION DISASTERS: WHEN SH*T HITS THE FINN

You will be introduced to the consequences of absent or ineffective internationalisation. Using real world examples, Gary will demonstrate the tragic cost of remedial action and its negative impact on localisation. He will describe preventative actions that all localisation project managers must take and expose you to an award-winning innovation that has proved to make a significant difference to localisation.

13:00-14:00
Break 14:00-14:30
Certification Exam Two hours to complete a 75 question certification test 14:30-16:30

About Your Trainer

Willem_Stoleer_Localization_Institute_team-200x200

Willem grew up in Amsterdam where he obtained his undergraduate and graduate degrees at the University of Amsterdam. After many years in software development, Willem made the move to localization. He has over 25 years of experience in translation, localization and internationalization of marketing materials, software products and web content. Training for localization is a top priority for Willem with focus on project, quality and risk management. Willem has spent four years with the Project Management Institute as director of professional development for the Portland chapter. He is also a former professor at the Monterey Institute of International Studies and has been involved with the Localization Institute from the start.

Willem is the creator and presenter of the Localization Project Management Certification and the Quality Management in Translation Certification Programs. Willem also organizes the US and European round tables for project management.

Warsaw.

Registration for this event is now CLOSED.

 THIS EVENT MUST BE PAID FOR

VIA SPECIAL INVOICE

Please fill out the registration form below and you will be issued the invoice.

Course Fees

Early Bird Single Registration  (20% off) – Until March 4th – €1,160 + 23% VAT

Regular Single Registration – €1,450 + 23% VAT

Early Bird Group Registration (20% off) –  Until March 4th – €1,025  + 23% VAT each

Regular Group Registration (~10% less for 2+) – €1,275 + 23% VAT each  

Group registration discounts are offered when 2 or more individuals from the same organization register together. The discount is not retroactive.

Program fees include online training, registration for the on-site workshop, test fees for the certification exam, program materials, and lunch and breaks during the 2-day workshop.

Discounts must be used at registration; they are not retroactive. Early Bird tickets must be paid for within 1 week after Early Bird deadline.

Attendees are responsible for their own travel and lodging.

Purchase Instructions

Please be sure to select Pay Via Invoice as your  payment option when purchasing tickets to this event.

You will receive an Invoice with Banking Information for Wire Payment.

Cancellation Policy:

The Localization Institute, Inc. reserves the right to cancel the Localization Project Management Certification Program if there are less than 15 registrants by May 7th, one month prior to the workshop.

If the program is cancelled, you will receive a full refund, minus $400 if you have already started the online training portion.  We can make accommodations to allow you to take the test remotely and receive the certification.  If you choose to do so, you will receive a full refund of the registration fee, minus $600.

If you cancel your registration, there will be no refund if you have started the online study portion. If you have not started the online study portion, you will receive a refund if you cancel up to 3 weeks prior to the workshop. After that, there is no refund.

Heidelberg Project Managers Round Table

Heidelberg Project Managers Round Table

Objectives

  • Promote a better understanding of the localization project management environment on both sides of the industry
  • Create a channel of open communication for project managers to discuss specific issues of localization project management outside the client-vendor relationship
  • Discuss the dynamics of the localization activities on the client and vendor sides
  • Peer-to-peer exchange of ideas
  • Sharing of experiences
  • Frank and free discussions of issues confronting the industry
  • Networking
  • Evaluation of recent developments

What happens at the Round Table?

Most Round Table attendees have three or more years of experience in localization project management. As a result, presentations and discussions deal with advanced topics. The format of the Localization Project Managers Round Table relies on short presentations, some of them impromptu, followed by extensive discussions involving as many attendees as possible.

An Advisory Board is being organized to assist in the creation of an agenda and to facilitate the topics and presentations that will compose the 2018 Localization Project Managers Round Table. Ulrich Henes (Founder, The Localization Institute) and Willem Stoeller (PMP and Round Table Leader) will co-chair the Advisory Board. Photos and bios of the Advisory Board members will be included further down this page.

To ensure that topics for the Round Table are as relevant as possible to those participating, we are keeping an open session on the last day of the event. The topics for this open session will be determined by the attendees, who will be able to contribute their proposed topics throughout the event.

The Round Table’s success depends on people being willing to share information and experiences freely. To encourage that, no formal minutes or records are kept or published. Attendees are free to keep their own notes.

Discussion of localization prices and details of vendor contracts is not permitted.

Ticket prices include two (2)  dinners.

Heidelberg

Registration Information

Fee for the 2018 Project Managers Round Table:

  • Single Registration  – €1100 + 19% MwSt – closes on February 19
  • Group Registration (2 or more ) – €1000 / person + 19% MwSt- closes on February 19

To Request Additional Information Please contact:

Willem Stoeller
The Localization Institute

Lead, Professional Program Development

willem@localizationinstitute.com

+15034678716 (Pacific Coast Timezone)

Heidelberg Round Table Agenda (In development)

Day 1  (Monday, February 26)

3:00 – 11:00 pm              Registration Open; Guest Room Check-In

5:00 – 6:15 pm                Opening Reception in Session Room)

6:15 – 6:30 pm                Walk to Dinner Venue (10 minutes)

6:30 – 8:15 pm                Welcome Dinner

8:15 – 8:30 pm                Return Walk to Campus

8:30 – 9:30 pm                Welcome Session / Introductions

 Moderator: Willem Stoeller (Round Table Leader)

 

Day 2  (Tuesday, February 27)

7:15 – 8:00 am                Continental Breakfast in the session room

8:00 – 9:30 am               Session #1 – Automation (Markus Meisl)

9:30 – 9:40 am               Break

9:40 – 11:10 pm              Session #2 – Agile development processes and their impact on localization (Erik Vogt)

11:10 – 11:20 am             Break

11:20 – 12:50 pm            Session #3 – Processes/best practices for PMs for dealing with user/network generated content (Vanessa Hirthe-Steinle)

12:50 – 1:50 pm              Lunch

1:50 – 3:20 pm                Session #4 –In Country Review or Client Review (Sonja Brass)

3:20 – 3:30 pm               Break

3:30 – 5:00 pm               Session #5 – Multimedia localization (Michaela Bartelt)

5:00 – 6:15 pm               FREE TIME

6:15 – 6:30 pm                Walk to Dinner Venue (10 minutes)

6:30 – 8:30 pm              Dinner

8:30 – 8:45 pm              Return Walk to Campus (10 minutes)

 

Day 3  (Wednesday, February 28)

7:45 – 8:30 am                Continental Breakfast in the session room

8:30 – 10:00 am             Session #6 – L10n platforms or management tools (Maria Ramos)

10:00 – 10:15 am            Break

10:15 – 11:45 am             Session #7 – Metrics and KPIs (Willem Stoeller)

11:45 – 1:00 pm              Lunch

1:00 – 2:30 pm               Session #8 – Open Session

2:30 pm                           Adjourn / Guest Room Check-Out

Your Round Table Moderators 

  • Willem StoellerRound Table Leader

    Willem_Stoleer_Localization_Institute_team-200x200

    Willem grew up in Amsterdam where he obtained his undergraduate and graduate degrees at the University of Amsterdam. After many years in software development, Willem made the move to localization. He has over 25 years of experience in translation, localization and internationalization of marketing materials, software products and web content. Training for localization is a top priority for Willem with focus on project, quality and risk management. Willem has spent four years with the Project Management Institute as director of professional development for the Portland chapter. He is also a former professor at the Monterey Institute of International Studies and has been involved with the Localization Institute from the start.

    Willem is the creator and presenter of the Localization Project Management Certification and the Quality Management in Translation Certification Programs. Willem also organizes the US and European round tables for project management.


  • Ulrich HenesAdvisory Board Co-Chair

    Ulrich Henes

    Ulrich Henes is the Founder and President of The Localization Institute.  Already in his early years, Ulrich was fascinated by language, cultural differences, and global business. He spent the first decade of his career organizing international campaigns against the arms race and apartheid; and promoting global social justice.  For the past 25 years Ulrich has channeled his passion for all things global into promoting awareness and respect for differences among people, countries, and languages in the international business community.

  • Markus MeislManager Translation Services at SAP

    Marcus Meisl

    Markus Meisl is a member of the management team of the language services department at SAP, one of the world’s leading providers of enterprise software. His current focus is on managing the three translation and localization service teams handling the product units for cloud, technologies and platforms, and mergers and acquisitions. Previously, Markus headed the central corporate translation team for German and English at SAP. Since joining SAP’s implementation methodology group in 1998, he has covered various roles within knowledge and product management ranging from translation and coordination of technical documentation, product definition and early training, to rollout and partner relations. In the 1990s, Markus worked as a freelance translator and interpreter in Vancouver, Canada, where he became involved in his first localization projects. He also worked as a freelance interpreter for the European Commission in Brussels. Markus holds a degree in conference interpreting for German, Spanish and Portuguese from the University of Heidelberg.

  • Michaela Bartelt Senior Localization Director at Electronic Arts

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    Michaela Bartelt is senior localization director at EA, heading up all worldwide localization functions including translation, recordings, vendor management, testing and engineering for the video game developer and publisher. Originally a translator by education, she looks back at 15 years of experience in the game localization industry. Her current focus is shaping the strategic direction of localization in the company’s shift to online service models.

  • Erik Vogt Director of Solutions at Moravia

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    Erik Vogt is Director of Solutions at Moravia, and has worked with some of the world’s most ambitious and innovative technology customers in the world since 1998. His focus is on management and in developing data-driven solutions that solve real business problems in language services. With a passion for metrics, people and lateral thinking, Erik enjoys helping frame problems and quantitatively evaluate and implement unique win-win solutions.

  • Maria Ramos Localization Manager

    Maria

     

    María Ramos Merino is a freelance localization manager and consultant, offering expertise in translation tools, process, and workflows. She currently acts as Localization Manager at Beabloo and supports LocWorld and the Localization Institute on various projects. Previously, María worked as Production Manager at Version internationale, a French translation provider. She has performed several positions on the vendor side and has extensive knowledge of the industry. Technology savvy, María holds a Master’s degree in Translation Technologies from Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona.

     

  • Vanessa Hirthe-Steinle Feature Manager

    Vanessa Hirthe-Steinle

    As Feature Manager, Vanessa Hirthe-Steinle handles the ongoing strategic development of certain features of the online platform crossMarket.

    After completing her studies in German philology, history, and political science, she worked as a project manager and business development manager for language service providers in Germany and Switzerland for several years.

    From 2013 to 2016, Vanessa worked at Across Systems GmbH as Team Leader Language Service Providers responsible for handling customer concerns of translation companies.

    In 2016, she chose to depart from Across Systems and the industry before eventually returning as Feature Manager for crossMarket in 2017.

     

  • Sonja Brass

Media Sponsor

LocWorld35 – Silicon Valley

LocWorld35 – Silicon Valley

silicon_valley_sunset-1

LocWorld is the leading conference for international business, translation, localization and global website management. Attendees are the people responsible for communicating across the boundaries of language and culture in the global marketplace. With a specific emphasis on global business the conference provides an opportunity for the exchange of high-value information in the language and translation services and technologies market.

The conference is especially valuable for companies that want to venture into new international markets. People new to localization will benefit from the Global Business Best Practices and the Localization Core Competencies tracks as well as the informative exhibition area. Experienced professionals attend to learn about new tools, methods and business practices in the areas of localization and internationalization. Networking and mutual problem discussion opportunities will abound at the social gatherings, meals and break periods. Exhibitors will be present to provide information about their products and services to all levels of attendees.

Silicon Valley L10N PM Certification 2017

Silicon Valley L10N PM Certification 2017

Registration For This Event Is Now Closed!

Requirements

Attendees will have 3-5 years of experience in localization on either the vendor or buyer side. It is essential that participants bring a laptop to the classroom sessions. Please contact us if you have questions about the pre-requisites. The videos can also be viewed on a tablet or smartphone by accessing Litmos through the device’s browser.

Workshop Agenda

 

October 30, 2017
Arrival/Check in 9:00-9:30
Introductions and Review After introductions, the presenter will review the self study materials and answer questions 9:30-10:30

 

Break 10:30-11:00
Localization Maturity In small groups discuss, document and present global readiness and localization maturity of your own organization 11:00 – 12:00
Lunch 12:00-1:00
Planning In small groups develop, document and present a work breakdown structure for a fictitious project 1:00-2:30
Break 2:30-3:00
Scheduling In small groups create a schedule for building your house 3:00-4:00
Done That, What Is Next? Now that you have completed this localization project management program, what is next? Willem will lead a discussion on other learning opportunities ranging from processes and technology to open exchange with other localization project managers or even general project management. 4:00-5:00

 

October 31, 2017
Risk Management In small groups develop, document and present a Risk Breakdown Structure for a fictitious project 9:00-10:30
Break 10:30-11:00
Case Study Human Customer Support at Machine Speed 
by Patrick McLouglin of Eventbrite
11:00-12:00
Lunch 12:00-1:00
Case Study Enterprise Metrics Dashboard 
by Anna Schlegal of NetApp
1:00-2:00
Break 2:00-2:30
Certification Exam Two hours to complete a 75 question certification test 2:30-4:30
silicon-valley-web-eventa

Registration Now Closed!

Course Fees

Single registration: $ 1,450
Group registration: $ 1,275

(Group registration discounts are offered when 2 or more individuals from the same organization register.)

Discounts must be used at registration; they are not retroactive.

Program fees include online training, registration for the on-site workshop, test fees for the certification exam, program materials, and lunch and breaks during the 2-day workshop.

Attendees are responsible for their own travel and lodging.

About Your Trainer

Willem_Stoleer_Localization_Institute_team-200x200

Willem grew up in Amsterdam where he obtained his undergraduate and graduate degrees at the University of Amsterdam. After many years in software development, Willem made the move to localization. He has over 25 years of experience in translation, localization and internationalization of marketing materials, software products and web content. Training for localization is a top priority for Willem with focus on project, quality and risk management. Willem has spent four years with the Project Management Institute as director of professional development for the Portland chapter. He is also a former professor at the Monterey Institute of International Studies and has been involved with the Localization Institute from the start.

Willem is the creator and presenter of the Localization Project Management Certification and the Quality Management in Translation Certification Programs. Willem also organizes the US and European round tables for project management.

Cancellation Policy:

The Localization Institute, Inc. reserves the right to cancel the Localization Project Management Certification Program if there are less than 15 registrants by one month prior to the workshop.

If the program is cancelled, you will receive a full refund, minus $400 if you have already started the online training portion.  We can make accommodations to allow you to take the test remotely and receive the certification.  If you choose to do so, you will receive a full refund of the registration fee, minus $600.

If you cancel your registration, there will be no refund if you have started the online study portion. If you have not started the online study portion, you will receive a refund if you cancel up to 3 weeks prior to the workshop. After that, there is no refund.

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